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Marci Hertz Bettina Love PhD Keli Mullins MEd, MA Catherine Ramstetter PhD, CHES, FASHA Lindsay Titus Kayce Solari Williams PhD, MPH, MS Loretta Williams Gurnell BS, MEd
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Catherine Ramstetter PhD, CHES, FASHA

Catherine Ramstetter PhD, CHES, FASHA

School Health Consultant
Successful Healthy Children

About this Speaker

A Health Educator with an interest child and school health, Dr. Cathy Ramstetter is a School Health Consultant with Successful Healthy Children, the non-profit she founded in 2015. In this role, she assists schools with wellness initiatives and is a recess researcher and advocate. Her aim is to protect recess for every child everyday and to foster children’s healthy growth and development—intellectually, socially, emotionally and physically. Since 2007, Cathy has served on the Ohio Chapter of the AAP’s Home and School Health Committee, and is the co-author of AAP’s Policy on Recess with Dr. Bob Murray. She is currently conducting Action Research with a Cincinnati Public elementary school to explore and enhance the experience of meaningful play at recess (as of 3/15/2020, this study has been suspended, pending schools reopening). Cathy contributed to Ohio’s Health Education Model Curriculum as a member of the Safety & Violence Prevention Writing Team last year. She is the Secretary of the Board of Directors for the American School Health Association and also serves on the Board of DePaul Cristo Rey High School in Cincinnati. Dr. Ramstetter is an adjunct professor with The Christ College of Nursing & Health Sciences, teaching Health & Wellness in the RN-BSN program. In April, 2020, Cathy was a founding member of the Global Recess Alliance, formed of academic leaders from the US, Canada, United Kingdom and Australia, which guides schools to rethink policies and practices for recess time.

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